Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

[Contrasting] a résumé, a cover letter allows job applicants [to write in] a [more conversational] style and to suggest [their] possible contributions to a company's success.Why is contrasting wrong?

It’s just the wrong word. You might say that resumes and cover letters have contrasting purposes, but this usage doesn’t work.

The sentence should begin with the word unlike.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Hi, I am extremely bad at sentence corrections and grammar related problems. Where you would recommend for someone like me to begin? I am willing to invest time and effort into this. (To get a better idea, I scored a 4/17 for sentence corrections on the PSAT)

My favorite grammar book is The Ultimate Guide to SAT Grammar. You can also check out my grammar posts here, and the free posts from Erica Meltzer, who wrote the grammar book linked above, here.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Do you have any handwriting recommendations for the essay? I don't write on paper very often, and I always feel cumbersome and slow when I do. I have not yet been able to write a full two-page essay during practice tests, but I feel like I could if my hands would just move faster! I'm more comfortable printing than writing cursive, but—apparently—my printing is far less intelligible. If I want a good speed/readability ratio, how should I be practicing?

I wish I had some clever advice to give you here, but I actually have the same problem—I write illegibly, and the only fix is to slow down. I’m pretty confident that if you set aside some time to write a practice essay every day, you’ll be writing more neatly and quickly in a couple weeks, but other than that I’m at a loss for how to help.

Anyone else out there have a neat solution to this problem? 

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Hello! I just wanted to say thank you for all of your efforts with helping people like me with the SAT. I received a 670 on the math section the first time I took the SAT I seriously doubted my math abilities. I used your book to study over the summer and pwned the SAT in the fall when I retook it getting a 750 (made two silly mistakes :) As a result of your aid I was fortunate enough to be accepted into Brown and Yale for the Class of 2018! So thank you for your efforts. R.I.P. SAT for me!

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This is the best thing! Thanks for letting me know.

No pressure or anything, but I hope you’ll be walking through the Van Wickle Gates at my alma mater come fall.

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Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Have you ever seen the answer to an SAT question be "cannot be determined?"

Yes, of course!

One example I can think of off the top of my head is in the test that comes on the Blue Book DVD. Section 8, #10.

Who is out there telling you guys that you can just cross that answer off right away?

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

In what amount of time should I be finishing the practice exercises in your book? I can figure out all the problems; it just takes pretty long for some.

Don’t worry too much about how long it takes—worry about understanding the process and seeing afterwards (by looking at my solutions) whether there’s a faster way that you can solve similar problems in the future. 

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

For all positive integers x, the function f is defined by f(x) = (1/a^4)^x where a is a constant greater than 1. Which of the following is equivalent to f(2x)?

Seriously, no answer choices here?

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Here’s why answer choices are important: if you don’t consider them part of the question, then you totally forfeit the opportunity to plug in and get this question right even if you’re not rock-solid with the exponent rules. You’re really shooting yourself in the foot.

Here’s all I’ve got for you:

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Maybe that’s put in terms of negative exponents like below?

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Want to check and make sure those are equivalent? Plug in! Say a = 2 and x = 3. The original f(2x) becomes f(6):

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If we then saw an answer choice that said a^(-8x), we’d very quickly see that it’s the same.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

hi Mike! I'm confused about this grammar question: A number of innovative ideas for using the school's new lighting and sound systems have created enormous enthusiasm for the show. Is have correct or would it be has? And A number of is plural right? THANKS

This is a bad question. “Number” can go both ways, but it’s usually plural, especially when preceded by “a,” and not “the.”

It would be completely correct to say, “A number of pitchers have undergone Tommy John surgery.”

It’s also correct to say, “The number of car accidents at this intersection has fallen dramatically since the stop sign was installed.”

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Someone also asked this question but I am still confused about this question: Though I am (acquainted with) Mr. Bartholomew and have (long known of) his interest in the painting, that he has gone to such lengths (to obtain it) (astonishes me). (No Error). Can you explain this question in a different way? Thanks Mike! Happy Easter :)

When you ask new questions, instead of leaving a comment on the original post, then it becomes harder for people searching for the question in the future to see the whole conversation. PLEASE, in the future, use the Disqus comment box under each post to ask follow up questions, rather than submitting new ones.

It’s really tough to explain why a sentence doesn’t have an error other than to run through every choice and say that it’s fine. 

  • "Acquainted with" is a correct idiom.
  • "Long known of" is, again, a correct idiom. Putting "long" in front of "known of" is just another way of saying "known of for a long time."
  • "Gone to such lengths to obtain it" is also fine. Going to such lengths ___ is fine, as long as ___ is an infinitive.
  • The subject of “astonishes” is “that,” which is fine.
Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Infants have demonstrated that they are capable of attaching to fathers (in very much the same way as mothers). A) the same B) very much like mothers C) like mothers D) in very much the same way as they attach to mothers E) in a manner quite similar to that present with mothers. I chose E because A, B, and C are obviously wrong and D has the ambiguous pronoun they, which could refer to the fathers.

The pronoun in (D) isn’t logically ambiguous—we’re comparing the way infants attach to two different things, so in well written parallel structure (below) it’s obvious that the “they” refers to infants.

Infants have demonstrated that they are capable of attaching to fathers in very much the same way as they attach to mothers.

If you don’t buy that, though, then eliminate (E) because “a manner present with mothers” makes no sense, but that’s what the sentence is taking if you substitute “a manner” for the “that” which replaces it.

senyasyoss asked:

Official Q: A group of people ordered 9 pizzas, each of which had 8 slices. Each person ate 2 or 3 slices. The Number of people who ate 3 slices was twice the number of people who ate 2 slices, and no pizza was left. How many people were in the group? A) 9 B) 18 C) 24 D) 27 E) 30

You can totally backsolve this one.

There were 9 × 8 = 72 slices total.

Try (C) first. If there were 24 people in the group, then 16 ate 3 slices and 8 ate 2 slices. (16 × 3) + (8 × 2) = 64, so that’s too few people.

Now try (D). If there were 27 people, then 18 ate 3 slices and 9 ate 2 slices. (18 × 3) + (9 × 2) = 72! There you have it—(D) is the answer.

The algebra (because I know you guys too well) goes like this:

There are x people who ate 2 slices, and y people who ate 3 slices.

2x + 3y = 72
2x = y

A little substitution gives you:

y + 3y = 72
4y = 72
y = 18

If y = 18, then x = 9, and the total number of people, x + y, equals 27.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Jocelyn, my friend (since) junior high school, believes she is (more well suited) to a career in the sciences (than to) the business career her parents (have urged her) to pursue. What's the error and how to correct this? How is this a level 2 question? It's so hard.

Here’s a rarely-tested rule: don’t say “more ___” if the ___ is an adjective that has a comparative form. Since there is a comparative form of wellbetter—it’s incorrect to say more well.

Most comparatives are created just by adding an -er to the end of the adjective: faster, smarter, younger. Others, like better, are irregular, and therefore a bit trickier.

Some adjectives can’t be made comparative at all, and that’s when we use “more.” An example is beautiful. Since beautifuller is not a word, we use more beautiful if we need a comparative.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

The radio station received "the most number of" calls from listeners "on the evening" "it" aired a discussion of "the music of" Aretha Franklin. "No error"

Idiom error in (A). You can say the most calls or the greatest number of calls, but not the most number of calls.

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