ifaithoholic asked:

Alright, first off, you're very sweet for helping us out on the SATs. It's very considerate of you and I honestly think your explanations are wonderful. I have a bunchhh of questions and I was wondering if it would be best to Email them to you instead? (Whatever suits you best) Here goes question number one: For any real numbers, A and B such that A(is not equal to) -B. let A*B be defined by A*B= 2-b/a+b= 16 and a-b=64, whats that value of A? (break it down please) Thank you!

Thanks, I’m glad you like the work I’m doing here. Please submit all your questions through the site—that simplifies my work flow. 

I feel like you’ve typed this question funny—it can’t always be true that A*B = 16. Can you retype it (or just post a picture of it) in the comments?

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Tom and Alison are both salespeople. Tom’s weekly compensation consists of $300 plus 20 percent of his sales. Alison’s weekly compensation consists of $200 plus 25 percent of her sales. If they both had the same amount of sales and the same compensation for a particular week, what was that compensation, in dollars?

See here.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

When should one start studying for the SATs?

Depends on when one wants to take the test, how well one wants to do, and where one is starting from. :)

As a general rule, sometime between the end of sophomore year and the middle of junior year.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Hi mike I was trying out different tests on your website, but all of them gave me a score of 0 and no reports. Is it me or your website; I felt very frustrated?

That’s strange—they’re working fine for me. Can you email me (mike@pwnthesat.com) with your username and some details like what browser you’re using?

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Let GCF (x,y) represent the greatest common factor of x and y. If p is a positive even integer less than 11, for what value of p does GCF (x^2, 81) have the greatest value?

If p = 9, then GCF (9^2, 81) = GCF (81, 81) = 81. You can’t do better than that!

I’m a dodo bird—the question says p must be even!

The factors of 81 are: 1, 3, 9, 27, and 81. 

Of the even integers less than 11, the best you’re going to do is 6. 6^2 = 36, which has 9 as a factor. So GCF (6^2, 81) = GCF (36, 81) = 9.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Hey mike , can you help me? 2 edition blue book, test#10, section 4, # of question 24

Here’s the relevant sentence:

In this sense, a theoretical world in which there was no medium to get in the waywas only a “hairbreadth” away from the real one.

The passage is all about abstracting out irrelevant information, and here we’re talking about ignoring the medium (e.g. air, water) when analyzing motion. The medium is the irrelevant information. Too much information in physics makes things harder to understand. So the author uses the phrase “get in the way” to emphasize the difficulty created by too much information.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

However (ironic) it may seem, the concept of "brain-based education," an approach that (grounds) teaching strategies in the findings of scientists who study the function and development of our minds, is still fairly new, particularly to high school teachers. I don't understand why these two vocabulary words are correct here??

I’m sure it’s “grounded” that’s throwing you. There are many definitions of ground, but here’s the one that’s in play: 

transitive v. To provide a basis for (a theory, for example); justify.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Even small emotional shifts and dramatic twists (keep the audience's attention focused and can provoke viewers to develop) their own emotional connections to a play. Why is it no error? I thought the words before and after "and" weren't parallel? Thanks!

Yeah, this is fine. The “can” is what makes it seem not parallel, but you don’t need to have a “can” on both sides of the ”and.”

Here’s a similar sentence:

Rain makes he ground wet and can make you wet if you forget your umbrella.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

The value of 10 pounds of gold is d dollars and a pound of gold has the same value as p pounds of silver. What is the value in dollars of one pound of silver?

PLUG IN FOR YOUR LIFE!

Say d = 30, so each pound of gold costs $3. (Remember, when you’re plugging in your aim is to work with easy numbers, not be realistic.) Now say p = 2, so 2 pounds of silver are worth $3 (the same as one pound of gold). 1 pound of silver, then, will be worth $1.50. 

One of the answer choices will give you $1.50 when you plug in 30 for d and 2 for p. It’ll probably look like d/(10p).

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

(PSAT 2012 Practice 5-28) [Departing from] the [largely ceremonial] role [traditionally assigned] to the First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt used her position [to promote] social reform. Why is there no error in [largely ceremonial]? Isn't that a compound adjective, thus it has to be hyphenated? I read somewhere that it is hyphenated chiefly in British English. Is this true? (I just remembered that out of my sixth grade class about punctuation)

It’s an adverb (largely) and an adjective (ceremonial) and that’s fine. One of the uses of adverbs is to modify adjectives. 

Perhaps more importantly, that’s not the kind of thing the SAT tests. I’ve never, in all my years doing this, seen even one question where the error was a missing hyphen.

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