Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

While (it was) different (from) all of the other classes he had ever taken, Erik was still (unhappy) with his psychology class. (No error) Why is "it was" not incorrect? Is the first part not a dangling modifier? Thanks in advance!

No, the first part is not a dangling modifier because it has an “it,” which clearly refers to the psychology class. Dangling modifiers will refer to a subject without using a noun or pronoun to represent the subject.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

My father insists that before (buying a used car, have it) thoroughly inspected by a reputable mechanic (a) buying a used car, have it (b) buying a used car, it is (c) buying a used car, I have it (d) I buy a used car to have it (e) I buy a used car having it Can you explain the incorrect answers please?

(A) and (B) don’t say who’s buying the car. (D) and (E) have wrong forms of the verb “have”—(D) has it as an infinitive for no reason, and (E) puts an incorrect “-ing” on it.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

In the XY plane, the points (5,e) and (f,7) are on a line that is perpendicular to the graph of the line y= -1/5X+12. Which of the following represents e in terms of f? Answer) -5f + 32

The rule about perpendicular line slopes tells you that (5, e) and (f, 7) are on a line with a slope of 5. So use the slope formula to write an equation, then solve it for e:

image

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

By incorporating Pueblo figures into her strongly geometric and abstract ( work is why) Pueblo artist Helen Hardin has had a significant impact on contemporary Native American artist.Why is ( work is why) wrong? Thanks

The “is why” is unnecessary. Fix it by replacing “is why” with a comma:

By incorporating Pueblo figures into her strongly geometric and abstract work, Pueblo artist Helen Hardin has had a significant impact on contemporary Native American art.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Many jazz enthusiasts would have to admit that (their having) unjustly overlooked the music of Bennie Nawahi,who popularized the Hawaiian steel guitar sound in the early 1930's. Why is (their having) wrong? I thought their is referred to enthusiasts?

Sure, “their” refers to the enthusiasts, but that doesn’t make the structure correct. As long as it is, this is a fragment as written. We can fix that by giving it a main verb—changing “their having” to “they have.”

The problem with “their having” is that it suggests that the sentence will continue, e.g. “Many jazz enthusiasts would have to admit that their having overlooked Bennie Nawahi IS A MAJOR OVERSIGHT.” Now the sentence is complete, because it has a main verb: “is.”

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Why is #31 on page 411 C and not A?

Sentences 3 and 4 are both about how castles are fortified to keep unwanted people out. (A) is a total distraction—who cares who built the walls? (C) links the sentences nicely—the walls, moats, etc. were there to scare you away, but if you weren’t scared away, then the people in the castle would have a much easier time shooting you with arrows than you would shooting them.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

p 150 #5 why is the answer E?

That’s a syntax you’re probably not used to seeing, so it’s natural to be suspicious of it, but you can eliminate all the other choices for very legit reasons:

  1. run-on
  2. run-on
  3. being (the worst word ever), plus it’s a fragment
  4. you can’t use present tense (“is”) to talk about the development of the railroads last century.
Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

NO one but a fool would readily lend money to a person who is known (to be) a frequent gambler.Why is (to be) not wrong? I thought it should be known as...

It’s not wrong because it’s not wrong. Change your thought pattern when you choose something that’s not an error: instead of wondering why it’s not wrong, file it away in your brain as an acceptable way to phrase things. 

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

both x and y are real numbers. (x-y)^2 = 37 and xy = 4. What is the value of (x+y)^2?

This is all about solving for expressions—one of the most important skills you can develop for SAT math dominance.

Foil out the first equation:

x^2 – 2xy + y^2 = 37

Note that you know xy, so you can substitute!

x^2 –2(4) + y^2 = 37
x^2 + y^2 = 45

Cool so far, right? But you’re not done. You need (x + y)^2, which is very much NOT the same thing as above. FOIL that out, too!

x^2 + 2xy + y^2 = ?

Awesomely, we already know what all those things are.

Rearrange and substitute:

x^2 + y^2 + 2xy
45 + 2(4)
53

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

The city library donated some children’s books to Mr. Clark’s first-grade class. If each student takes 4 books, there will be 20 books left. If 3 students do not take a book and the rest of the students take 5 books each, there will be no books left. How many books were donated to the class? (A) 120 (B) 140 (C) 160 (D) 175 (E) 185

I’ve done this one here.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

In the figure above, the intersecting circles are tangent at the indicated points. The centers of all the circles lie on a line. The diameter of the large circle is d and the three small circles are congruent. What is the perimeter of the shaded region, in terms of d?

If you post a pic of the figure in the comments, I will help you with this.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Most experts believe that young children’s not being given physical affection, this interferes with their normal development.(C) the failure at giving young children physical affection would interfere (1) explain what's wrong with the failure (2) when is it proper to use "would"

Nothing’s wrong with “the failure” by itself—the problem is “the failure at giving.” Idiomatically, we say “the failure to give.”

Here’s a whole big thing about “would.”

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

The new vaccine is ** preventing certain forms of pneumonia and should, therefore, be more widely ** in order to prevent outbreaks of the disease. My question is actually grammar. I thought that only FANBOYS can be used to connect two phrases and not "therefore"

But there is a FANBOYS there: “and.” The therefore is set off by a comma on each side—it’s a little aside, not the main transition. Since the second part of the sentence has the same subject as the first, we don’t need a comma before “and.”

Here, check this out:

The new vaccine is effective at preventing certain forms of pneumonia and should be more widely used…

See—no comma needed.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

In the figure above, triangle ABC is inscribed in the circle, which has center O (between A and C on the diameter, B is the only one not on it). If AB= AO, what is the measure of angle BCA ? So the triangle is on the upper half of the circle's diameter and you'd probably guessed it, that AB and BC are not equals. There's a line linking B and O as well. A. 25 degrees, B. 30, C. 45, D. 50, E. 60.

So, like this?

image

The first thing you know is that, because AO and BO are radii, they’re equal to each other. Because we also know AB = AO, we know that triangle ABO is equilateral, and thus all its angles are 60 degrees.

We also know that angle ABC is 90 degrees, because it’s an inscribed angle corresponding to a diameter. I’ve never seen a real SAT question requiring this knowledge, so I’m guessing this isn’t a real SAT question. (Edit: It is a real SAT question, and you don’t need that knowledge—see the comments below this post.)

So if angle BAC is 60 degrees and angle ABC is 90 degrees, then angle BCA must be 30 degrees.

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